Fashion & Textiles Agenda

Fashion & Textiles

Room Name: Sirius

Day1: June 27, 2019

Networking breakfast
8:15 am - 8:55 am
Keynote Session
9:00 am - 12:25 pm

Moderator:
Nicole Rycroft
Founder and Executive Director
Canopy
 

9:00 am

Circular Economy in textiles, an opportunity to find new solutions
Mauro Scalia
Director Sustainable Businesses
The European Apparel and Textile Confederation (EURATEX)
Textiles are produced in one of the most complex, mutual-dependent and diverse industry value chain. Applying Circular Economy concepts in making and using textiles is an opportunity to address societal challenges at large scale, such as waste and use of resources. While complexity grows and challenges still outnumber the solutions, our industry calls for a new level of cooperation between society, business and policymakers. New partnerships and smart policies are needed to promote sustainable purchasing practices and to stimulate the demand for circularity in products. Tackling the release of microplastics from the washing of synthetic textiles shows how a new form of cooperation can address global issues which no one can address alone. Last year five European industry associations reached a Cross Industry Agreement to facilitate world-class researchers in defining a harmonised test method, to share knowledge and to find feasible and effective solutions.
 

9:25 am

Plastic Use and Re-Use at Patagonia: A Comprehensive Approach to Outdoor Apparel
Michelle Legatt
Materials Innovation Engineer
Patagonia
For more than 45 years, Patagonia has leveraged business to support sustainable supply chains and environmental activism. Patagonia takes responsibility for the entire life cycle of our products – from development & design to the garment’s end-of-life – we’ve made great progress, but still face significant challenges ahead. Much of this presentation focuses on Patagonia’s approach to raw material selection, microfibers and circularity.
 

9:50 am

Limiting our impact: inspiration from nature towards circular solutions
Debbie Luffman
Product Director
Finisterre
There are no off-the-shelf solutions when it comes to creating a sustainable product, but central to Finisterre’s sustainability ethos is good design. At this year’s inaugural Plastic Free World Conference & Exhibition, Debbie will share with delegates the ways in which Finisterre focuses on limiting its impact upon the environment, through its design process and textile development. This includes but is not limited to the company’s utilization of regenerated synthetics to low-chemical processing, natural fiber-use, its repair service, as well as single use in no-use commitment. She will explain why Finisterre feels positive about the future and why it’s never too late to turn the tide on over-consumption and close the loop on a toxic industry.
 
Break
10:15 am - 10:45 am

10:45 am

Fashion for Good: Driving Circular Innovation
Ashley J Holding
Innovation Manager
Fashion for Good
Fashion for Good will present the case for scalable and sustainable innovation in the fashion industry, sharing insights of their collaborative innovation platform based in Amsterdam. Selected innovators in their Accelerator and Scaling Programmes will be showcased, highlighting the impact on the fashion industry, through their innovations in recycling synthetic fibres at the end of their use or providing innovative bio-based alternative materials.
 

11:10 am

What a tree can do – sustainable fashion through innovation
Kirsi Seppäläinen
VP, Strategic projects
Stora Enso
Renewable materials company Stora Enso aims at replacing fossil-based materials. The demand for the new products is driven by megatrends and the need for more natural products, products that are traceable, renewable and reusable. The company is already part of the textile value chain as a producer of dissolving pulp from sustainably managed forests for the viscose industry and is continuously researching alternative, more sustainable textile fibres. At the end of 2018, Stora Enso joined TreetoTextile as a shareholder with H&M and IKEA to further develop the technology for cellulose-based sustainable textile fibres for industrial scaling-up.
 

11:35 am

Towards a zero waste textile industry: practical and scalable solutions
Hilde Van Duijn
Project Manager Circle Textiles Programme
Circle Economy
Circle Economy is an impact organisation, driving the transition to the circular economy. We work to identify opportunities to turn circular principles into practical reality. In a circular textiles industry, the lifecycle of all textiles is engineered to maximise value, re-use and harvesting of materials. In our vision for a zero-waste textiles industry, garments which cannot be worn again still retain value. This entails reduced use of virgin materials and increased re-use of existing ones. This presentation will outline the journey towards a zero waste textile industry, illustrated with actual examples of practical and scalable solutions.
 

12:00 pm

Innovative bio-based textiles in a sustainable European economy
Lara Dammer
Head of Department Economy & Policy
Nova-Institute
The presentation will highlight how innovative bio-based textiles can make manifold positive contributions toward a sustainable European economy. Textiles are a fast-growing market globally, with plastics covering a huge proportion of the demand. On the downside, textiles are the biggest contributor to the microparticles issue in marine littering. Illustrating new technological developments and biodegradability issues, this presentation will tackle the microparticles debate as well as showcase several concrete applications in which bio-based materials can make a difference for enhanced sustainability.
 
Lunch
12:25 pm - 1:15 pm
Sustainable responsible manufacturing and reducing the plastic footprint
1:15 pm - 5:25 pm

Moderator:
Lara Dammer
Head of Department Economy & Policy
Nova-Institute

1:15 pm

Microfibers - Update on the textile industry’s response
Simone Seisl
Ambassador & Consultant for Fiber & Materials
TextileExchange
Sophie Mather
Board Chair
The Microfibre Consortium
Microplastics, including microfibers is – no doubt - a big issue. The textile industry is considered one of the major contributors of microfiber release into the environment. Textiles of any material shed millions of fibers throughout their cycle of being produced, worn, washed and discarded. The sector is facing a variety of challenges, and efforts to tackle this relatively new and complex issue will only be successful through broad industry collaboration and holistic approaches. Join this session to hear about where the industry currently is and what work is being done to tackle the microfiber issue.

1:40 pm

Plastic-free textile fibers without harmful chemicals
Janne Poranen
CEO
Spinnova
The concept of plastic-free textile fibers manufactured without the use of harmful chemicals may sound too good to be true. But it’s not. While the textile industry is acknowledged as a major contributor to the planet’s microplastics problem, most fashion and retail brands are desperately scouting for more sustainable options. Soon, sustainable, affordable and scalable materials will become available. Finland’s Spinnova, for instance, is developing a cellulose-based textile fiber that involves no dissolving or harmful chemicals, which is a major differentiator to the man-made cellulosics available today. In addition to FSC-certified wood, Spinnova can also use the innovative spinning method on waste streams such as agricultural waste. During this presentation, delegates will be able to learn about Spinnova’s unique and innovative bio-based textiles, the inspiration behind the R&D, how the company achieves zero waste streams, its sustainable production processes and how it is currently working with several retail partners developing fibers to suit application uses such as apparel, footwear and non-wovens.

2:05 pm

Learning from Nature: the long and the short of the plastics problem
Chris Holland
Research Lead
The University of Sheffield - FLIPT
The past year has seen a huge increase in public awareness of the global plastics problem. Yet despite our concern about the use of plastics, consumer demand for high-performance materials is forever increasing. The FLIPT project has been seeking to address this challenge by developing new ways to process plastics that are inspired by Nature, with an aim to introduce a potential 1000-fold energy saving to the industry. We will introduce you to our exciting and engaging collaborative work and give you an insight into how lessons from silk have been translated into processing materials; from synthetic polymers to spinning wood.
Break
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm

3:00 pm

Materials innovation for sustainable sporting goods
Thierry Le Blan
Textile Engineer for Sustainable Development
CETI
This presentation will focus on the materials innovation results from the EU-funded Sport Infinity project, the aim of which was to identify and develop innovative, partly waste-based, long-fiber reinforced composites, in doing so enabling the automatic production of easily customisable plastic sports goods. Led by the sports brand adidas, the project – which launched in June 2015 – involves partners from multiple disciplines and expertise from five European Union countries. One of the partners, CETI (the Centre for European Textile Innovations), played a key role in helping to meet the project’s ambitious research targets, which focused overall on four main areas: the development of a co-creation user interface; material innovation; product and process innovation; and product design innovation.

3:25 am

From field to finished product: labeling and licensing
Franziska Dormann
European Represtentative
Global Organic Textile Standard
This presentation will detail the role and relevance of the Global Organic Textile Standard (GOTS), the world’s leading standard for processing of textiles from certified organic natural fibers. The GOTS certification requires IFOAM’s Family of Standards Organic Production Standards for the raw fiber and sets stringent criteria along the entire textile value chain, including chemical input and International Labour Convention (ILO) social criteria. Only textile products made from at least 70% (label grade ‘Made with Organic’) or 95% (label grade ‘Organic’) certified organic raw materials can become GOTS certified. Certification to GOTS is a positive step for any company that has social responsibility at its core and guarantees to end users that along every step of the production process, from farm to finished product, the environment, the workers involved and the end user wearing the garment have been protected from the hazardous chemicals that are commonly used in textiles processing.

3:50 pm

Inspired by nature
Renana Krebs
Co-founder & CEO
Algalife
More than 100 years the fashion industry didn’t change. Why? We believe that Its time to release the power of nature rethinking of what a good fabric is. Our Algae bio-based innovation aspires to turn the Fashion industry environmental Problems into positive scalable solutions, by unlocking the power of algae & creating dyes and fibres in a 100% clean process in a closed loop system. our bio-based dyes and fibres are not only good for our planet by having a positive environmental footprint than traditional processes but, are also good for our skin by releasing anti-oxidants, vitamins, and minerals that can nourish and protect our body. This enables us to redesign the manufacturing process and products. Clean processes —> clean products —> clean planet.

4:15 pm

SDGs and Sustainable Products: Holistic Approaches and Trade Offs
Jürgen Towara
Partner and Senior Food Contact Expert
ERM
Activity around plastic has escalated rapidly, with signals suggesting pressure will only continue to increase. Effective collaboration will be imperative if we are to act at the scale and pace necessary to address the challenges combined with a holistic approach to address trade-offs with regard to current and future economic, environmental and social challenges contributing to the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The presentation will discuss: • Sustainable Products: Upstream and downstream aspects of the textile/fabric value chain • Product Innovation: Higher levels of recycling will only be achieved by improving the way plastics materials for textiles are produced and designed • SDGs and Plastic materials: a holistic way to sustainability means being aware of trade-offs

4:40 pm

Panel Discussion: Bringing next generation solutions to market
Nicole Rycroft
Founder and Executive Director
Canopy
Harald Cavalli-Björkman
Head of Communications
Re:newcell
Hua Sun
Chief Operating Officer
North American Green Pulp
In our quest to address the impacts of oil-based plastics, we need innovation that addresses one pressing environmental issue without making others worse. Join forest conservation not-for-profit Canopy and its corporate partners for a visionary discussion on supply chain transformation. From huge cost savings realized by reusing shipping boxes to cat-walking fashion away from endangered forests, panel participants will describe their successes and failures on their sustainability journey. The panel presentation will engage audience members in a dynamic and impactful exploration of the importance of forest protection in a plastic-free world.

5:30 pm

Drinks Reception & Networking Party - Sponsored by Lenzing

Day2: June 28, 2019

Creating textiles using natural and recyclable sources
9:00 am - 12:00 pm

Moderator:
Ashley J Holding
Innovation Manager
Fashion for Good
 

9:00 am

Cellulose-based materials as alternatives for plastics
Ali Harlin
Research Professor
VTT
As the most abundantly available natural polymer, cellulose is increasingly meeting the rising demand for sustainable textile fibers. Novel cellulose films provide novel properties and performance. By bringing thermoplastic properties to cellulose, it is possible to prepare high-quality materials that can be converted into, for instance, plastics for everyday applications, packaging materials, composites and textiles. VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland is an active developer of performing biomaterials from cellulose-based raw materials and was even recognized by The Ellen MacArthur Foundation as a Circular Materials Challenge winner for its compostable, lightweight cellulose film, which could be commercialized in the next few years. In this presentation, some of VTT’s latest findings and developments in the field will be discussed.
 

9:25 am

QMILK biopolymer: a sustainable and natural solution derived from a milk-based protein
Anke Domaske
Inventor
Qmilk
This presentation will highlight some of the applications of the QMILK biopolymer fiber, which is manufactured using high concentrations of the milk protein ‘casein’ and a select few other natural ingredients (no chemicals are used). With up to two million tonnes of milk being disposed of each year in Germany alone, the concept is entirely sustainable. Sourced from dairies, once the casein is separated from the waste (soured) milk, it is supplied to QMILK in powdered form to be transformed into the biopolymer fiber, which can then be used in numerous sectors from fashion and home textiles to automotive and medical applications. The whole process has specifically been developed to be zero-waste and the resultant fiber is 100% biodegradable and can be recycled into a soil additive as part of any composting process. The manufacturing process is also highly sustainable – 1kg of fiber takes just five minutes to produce, two litres of water and a maximum temperature of 80°C.
 

9:50 am

Orange Fiber: crafting the future of Fashion through sustainability and innovation
Enrica Arena
Co-Founder
Orange Fiber
Sustainable fashion is a goal for the future of our Planet and for the people who live there. It means a cultural and economic revolution, a radical shift from linear to a circular economy that involves the way we produce and consume. With Orange Fiber we are committed to bringing sustainable design and production values to the Fashion Industry, engaging industry professionals in build sustainable supply chain and adopt recycled and sustainable raw materials, raising awareness among consumers about their shopping habits and encouraging them to adopt a more conscious and sustainable attitude to fashion.
 
Break
10:15 am - 10:45 am

10:45 am

Bioplastics as a driver for sustainable outdoor gear
Clément Affholder
Polymer Scientist
VAUDE
As an outdoor sports outfitter, VAUDE has sustainability running as a green thread throughout its entire product life-cycle. Based on its own sustainability standard ‘Green Shape’ and on ambitious commitments to move away from fossil resources, VAUDE is driving the transformation of its industry toward the bio-economy and is looking into renewable carbon and natural fibers to create performant materials for outdoor apparel and gear.
 

11:10 am

Why and how to Re-think the Fashion Industry
Aniela Hoitink
Research, Textile & Concept Design
NEFFA
Why and how to Re-think the Fashion Industry challenges the current way of thinking in which people want to change consumer behaviour to become more sustainable. Instead of changing the behaviour of 7,5 billion people, we take Fast Fashion as an incredible opportunity. We are looking into changing material and production techniques, instead of changing human behaviour. By looking at nature’s own consumptive behaviour we have been able to find solutions for the problems we’re currently facing. These solutions are on the crossover of textile, technology and microbiology, re-thinking the complete fashion supply chain.
 

11:35 am

A new generation of bioplastics for value-added products – merging design and material science
Vlasta Kubusova
Founder
Crafting Plastics! Studio
Bio-based materials and circular economy have always been closely interconnected. In this presentation, the latest generation of NUATAN will be explored. Essentially a blend of two biopolymers, NUATAN is made from Polyactic Acid (PLA), a natural plastic derived from corn starch, and Polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB), made from corn starch that has been metabolized by microorganisms. With this new bio-based material, born out of a six-year research collaboration with material scientists at the Slovak University of Technology, Crafting Plastics! Studio wants to introduce completely biodegradable ready-to-wear products and added-value consumer goods that we use in our everyday lives. Through experimentation, collaboration and manufacturing, the product’s whole life-cycle is kept firmly in mind. And by establishing a transdisciplinary collaboration between the fashion industry, design and science, Crafting Plastics! Studio hopes to accelerate the transition to the circular economy.
 
Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
Closing the loop on a circular economy for textiles in clothing
1:15 pm - 4:30 pm

Moderator:
Chris Holland
Research Lead
The University of Sheffield - FLIPT

1:15 pm

circular.fashion - a sustainable change agency creating product and system innovation for a circular economy in fashion and textiles
Ina Budde
Founder
circular.fashion
To transform the industry to circular practices and enable fibre-to-fibre recycling to be used at scale, responsible, clever and creative decisions need to be taken in every aspect of a garment’s life - from choosing the right materials, design and construction, retail and use, to finally ensure reuse and recycling. circular.fashion has developed a digital platform for circular design and closed loop recycling. With their Circular Design Software and a sleek and smart tracking solution, the circularity.ID for garments, the platform enables a transparent flow of information between material suppliers, brands, customers and recyclers to collaboratively realise a circular economy for fashion and textiles.

1:40 pm

Black gold versus waste PET – time for a rethink
Vivek Tandon
Founder and CEO
PerPETual Global Technologies Limited
Following years of innovation, perPETual’s investors, employees and partners have realized their vision – to profitably commercialize its revolutionary proprietary technology capable of transforming waste PET plastic back into sustainable (poly)esters. This discussion will reveal the company’s innovative process, a unique way to reverse-engineer used plastic PET bottles (i.e. multi-ester molecules) into sustainable esters (monomers). Its sustainable esters can then be used as the building blocks to manufacture all PET-based products such as bottles, polyester textiles, films, packaging, etc. Currently processing more than 2.5 million bottles a day, perPETual is now expanding its existing plant to more than 10 million bottles a day and is even in discussion with partners to build new plants globally.

2:05 pm

Solvent-based recycling of PET and cellulose from end-of-life textiles
Adam Walker
Chief Scientific Officer
Worn Again Technologies
Using a combination of specifically formulated solvents, virgin-equivalent PET resin and cellulose pulp have been recovered from end-of-life textiles. The process removes dyes, additives, water, other polymers and environmental contaminants from the feed-stock and is applicable to any blend of PET and cellulosics (e.g. cotton), being able to accept up to 20% impurities. The dual outputs are obtained at sufficiently high purity and specification to enable return to the textiles supply chain, closing the loop for PET in clothing. This presentation will also discuss how the technology is being applied to waste bottles and PET packaging to produce textile-grade resin.
Break
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm

3:00 pm

Beyond the capsule – getting circular fashion to scale
Harald Cavalli-Björkman
Head of Communications
Re:newcell
The fashion industry has come some way in integrating post-industrial waste materials in products, but solutions for post-consumer materials have been lacking. Collection, sorting, processing technology and sheer logistics all pose obstacles to making high volume closed-loop recycling a reality. So, what would a workable system for recycling of old clothes at scale look like? In 2019, re:newcell and Bank & Vogue launched a unique industrial recycling partnership. 90 000 pairs of worn-out cotton jeans will now be transformed into virgin-equivalent rayon grade dissolving pulp using re:newcell’s patented upcycling technology.

3:25 pm

Cradle-to-cradle textiles: enabling a circular economy with a scientific basis
Friederike Priebe
Innovation Management Textiles
EPEA Internationale Umweltforschung GmbH
Textiles are produced, worn, washed and finally dumped. The key message in Friederike’s presentation will be to define their use scenarios and develop processes and service systems that create circular systems for them. Backing up this philosophy, she will present best practices from global supply chains and optimization processes based on the cradle-to-cradle design principles to enable a truly circular product.

3:50 pm

Panel Discussion: Sustainable textiles: a stitch in time saves nine
Chris Holland
Research Lead
The University of Sheffield - FLIPT
Harald Cavalli-Björkman
Head of Communications
Re:newcell
Ina Budde
Founder
circular.fashion
Janne Poranen
CEO
Spinnova
This panel seeks to close the loop on the discussion surrounding textile sustainability. Comprised of experts across the field, all sharing a common goal of developing a circular textile economy, where sustainability is a design specification, not a marketing afterthought. Please join us for what will be an engaging interactive and informative discussion where we aim to educate, encourage and promote the integration of sustainability into textile use.

4:30 pm

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