Automotive & Transport Agenda

Automotive & Transportation

Room Name: Solar

Day1: June 27, 2019

Keynote Session
9:00 am - 12:00 pm

9:00 am

Drivers of change impacting automotive plastics
Christian Hainz
Senior Analyst Automotive & Transportation
Ernst & Young (EY)
An accelerating pace of disruptive innovation driven by new entrants, regulation and collaborations is changing the automotive industry. Especially the electrification of the powertrain, evolving autonomous driving features and the rise of new mobility services are not only changing the way we use vehicles but also have a significant impact on future vehicle designs and materials.
 

9:25 am

Sustainable Materials for automotive applications
Christine Schütz
Project Manager – Materials and Manufacturing processes
Volkswagen AG
The increasing use of petrochemical plastics across industries poses a major challenge with regard to the carbon footprint and the utilization of waste products. To get a deeper understanding of what sustainable materials are, the meaning of the term sustainability will be explained. From a material perspective, this means the necessity of researching environmentally compatible resources and material concepts. Some interesting material approaches and research results will be discussed in more depth during the lecture.
 

9:50 am

Did the End-of-Life Vehicle Directive Pave the Road to Circular Economy?
Julien Van Damme
Manager Environment and Safety Planning Office
Honda Motor Europe
The ELV Directive forced the automotive sector to think about how to reach the high recycling targets. Also, the cost to achieve that target was very important. And this was not just a problem to solve during the next 15 years: also at the homologation of the car a strategy to achieve the 85/95% recycle and recovery target had to be included in the documentation. But how to start the cycle…?
 
Break
10:15 am - 10:45 am

10:45 am

Exploring the potential of bio-based composites and polymers in automotive applications
Lara Dammer
Head of Department Economy & Policy
Nova-Institute
Biocomposites, whether wood-plastic or natural fiber, present exciting opportunities for automotive applications as a result of their potential for lightweight construction and enhanced strength. Indeed, they have become integral for components such as instrument panels, seating systems, parcel shelves, side cladding and trunk linings. But bio-based plastics are also being utilized in tires, foams (seat upholstery) and vehicle mats. This presentation will highlight some innovative bio-based materials as well as the processes employed, answer questions about issues such as feed-stocks while also showcasing the latest sustainability data.
 

11:10 am

Conducting the change with thermoplastics filled with hemp fibres in Automotive industry: NAFILean proposal. Benefits – challenges - status on deployment – perspectives.
Jean-Marie Bourgeois-Jacquet
Business development Manager
APM - Automotive Performance Materials
A massive deployment of compounds using Natural fibres is not a view from few idealists. In the automotive environment, this type of material is used for more than 5 years with proven benefits on weight reduction. The presentation will present the conditions of success for such a material and the perspectives with new coming generations, for automotive plastics but also in other industries.
 

11:35 am

Soft and rigid biomaterial inside the automotive
Vittorio Bortolon
Managing Director
Plantura
Fabrizio Chini
Research Director
Röchling Automotive
 
Lunch
12:00 pm - 1:15 pm
Intelligent alternative materials to reduce the transportation sector's reliance on plastics
1:15 pm - 5:25 pm

Moderator:
Mark Reinders
CEO
HempFlax Group

1:15 pm

Biofore project - innovative replacement of plastics with renewable biomaterials
Pekka Hautala
Head of School, Automotive and Mechanical Engineering
Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Science
The Biofore Concept Car demonstrates the potential of wood-based biomaterials. Not only for the automotive industry, but also for various other end-uses including design, acoustics - a wide range of industrial and consumer applications. The concept car is designed and manufactured in partnership with Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Sciences, TEKES - the Finnish Funding Agency for Technology and Innovation and several other partner companies. The engineering and industrial design students of Metropolia designed and manufactured the car with the guidance of teachers who have successfully carried out several internationally renowned concept car projects.

1:40 pm

Biosteel: the first high-performance fiber with true environmental integrity
Volker Wagner-Solbach
Procurement and Supply Chain Management
Amsilk
AMSilk is the world’s first producer of spider silk in industrial scale. Spider silk protein, a natural biodegradable high-performance structure protein, can be used in three-dimensional applications such as AMSilk’s vegan hydrogel Silkgel in cosmetics, in two-dimensional applications such as coatings for medical implants and more or less one-dimensional applications such as Biosteel fibers for products in sporting goods, automotive or luxury industry applications.

2:05 pm

High-performance bamboo fiber reinforced polymers for a sustainable future in automotive & transportation
Karsten Brast
Founder & CEO
nature2need Europe
Spectalite is a global supplier of sustainable materials and products with up to 100% bio-content that helps increase the use of fast-renewable resources. Spectadur grades are made to endure, to reduce weight and cost and can be recycled. Spectabio grades are made to degrade, the material is 100% bio-degradable or compostable. High-Performance Bamboo Fiber Reinforced Spectadur grades come with significantly increased properties, especially specific properties are exceeding those of talc filled, glass-fiber reinforced or hemp and wood fiber reinforced thermoplastics. The implementation of these materials along with tailored designs decrease part weight and part costs up to 20%. The presentation outlines Spectalite´s material portfolio, a comparison of Spectadur grades to current materials along with a case study on part level where a tailored design could decrease the part weight by 15% without compromising on performance or costs.
Break
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm

3:00 pm

Developments in natural and recycled fibers and materials for automotive applications
George Kellie
Chairman
Kellie Solutions
The environment has become a crucial and vital issue in the strategies of automotive engineers. Blue Planet, Sky Ocean Rescue and the Ellen MacArthur Foundation are raising vital issues that demand a response from industry. This presentation will focus on state-of-the-art developments in a wide range of materials and technology applications.

3:25 pm

Renewables from the pulp and paper industry - a key to reducing the reliance on (conventional) plastics?
Johannes Ganster
Division Director Biopolymers
Fraunhofer IAP
The pulp and paper industry is a massive source for alternative materials to plastics. The combination of pulp fibers with commodity thermoplastics such as polypropylene into injection molding compounds is a reality by now and corresponding products can be bought on the market (e.g. Synbio®, DuraSense®, Formi®). Extending this combination approach to lignin and cellulose regenerated fibers is one of the main issues at the biopolymers division of Fraunhofer IAP. On the commodity side, it will be shown that melt blending up to 70 % lignin with polyolefins gives excellent mechanical properties (including impact) when the right blend morphology is realized. Fiber reinforced injection molding compounds will be presented using cellulose rayon as a reinforcing alternative to glass fibers. Improved cellulose fiber stiffness for reinforcing purposes will be shown to be possible via the cellulose-NMMO spinning method, an alternative to the viscose (rayon) route. The use of renewables from the pulp and paper industry to reduce the reliance on plastics is still in its infancy, but steady progress is apparent and, probably, inexorable.

3:50 pm

How milk protein bioplastics can have an impact on futures automotive industry by example of QMILK.
Anke Domaske
Inventor
Qmilk
QMILK is the fiber with the lowest CO2 emission worldwide, but it also can be turned into bioplastics. The bioplastic itself is flame retardant, antibacterial and can be thermoformed. Hear about potential QMILK applications in interior and composites. QMILK is able to solve this problem by using the commodity and building a zero-waste process. The carbon food print of this milk production can thus be turned into something sustainable instead of having to dispose of the milk. In Germany alone, this carbon emission corresponds to that of approximately 110.000 cars per year.

4:15 pm

NewspaperWood: from paper back to wood
Arjan van Raadshooven
Managing Director
NewspaperWood
NewspaperWood reverses a traditional production process – not from wood to paper, but from (news)paper back to wood. When a NewspaperWood log is cut, the layers of paper appear like wood grain or the growth rings of a tree and therefore resemble the aesthetic of real wood. NewspaperWood BV is dedicated to the production and development of the NewspaperWood material in order to find new intermediate products and innovative applications. Although the story of NewspaperWood started in the Dutch design scene, it has quickly transferred into automotive applications and has a wide spectrum of possibilities ahead.

4:40 pm

Panel Discussion: What are the alternatives?
George Kellie
Chairman
Kellie Solutions
Christian Lenges
Business Development BioMaterials
DuPont Industrial Biosciences
Johannes Ganster
Division Director Biopolymers
Fraunhofer IAP
Volker Wagner-Solbach
Procurement and Supply Chain Management
Amsilk

Day2: June 28, 2019

Advanced materials and bio-based alternatives in transportation applications
9:00 am - 12:25 pm

Moderator:
Pekka Hautala
Head of School, Automotive and Mechanical Engineering
Helsinki Metropolia University of Applied Science
 

9:00 am

Biocomposites in the automotive industry: potential applications and benefits
Blai López Rius
Composites department
AIMPLAS
Materials experts from numerous automakers estimate that an all-advanced composite auto body could be 50-67% lighter than a similarly sized steel auto body, as compared with a 40-55% mass reduction for an aluminium auto body and a 25-30% mass reduction for an optimized steel auto body. For the chassis of electrical vehicles, in particular, the lightweighting of materials is vital to offset the added weight of the batteries. At the same time and as a result of dwindling petroleum resources, composites derived from renewable resources have a great deal of potential benefits for OEMs, the environment and end customers. Renewability, biodegradability, price and weight advantages are all spurring interest in biocomposites in many markets, from automotive, rail and aerospace to military, construction and sports. The automotive sector, though, has been integral to their growth and is currently the second-largest application field. Despite all the upsides, though, biocomposites do have some drawbacks compared with synthetic variants, hence there is a great deal of research being conducted to improve the physical properties of natural reinforcements, including areas such as flame resistance and impact performance. In this regard, AIMPLAS will present its findings from various different transport projects involving thermoset and thermoplastic resins.
 

9:25 am

Natural fiber reinforcements to reduce and recycle plastics in automotive interiors
Christian Fischer
CEO
Bcomp
It is entirely feasible to reduce automotive interior weight by more than 60% versus injection-molded plastic as a result of powerRibs, a highly engineered natural fiber reinforcement. As delegates will discover, not only does it enable significant fuel savings/increase in driving range but also radically reduces the amount of resources required by replacing plastics with natural fibers. It also allows for the use of lower-grade plastics, such as recycled ocean plastics, for example as seen in Volvo Cars’ Recycled Plastics Demonstrator Vehicle that was unveiled in 2018.
 

9:50 am

Engineered polysaccharide reinforced hybrid composites in lightweight applications
Christian Lenges
Business Development BioMaterials
DuPont Industrial Biosciences
The broadening recognition that business models based on linear material flows become increasingly less sustainable is also driving and focusing innovation in the sustainable materials space. Product design and the associated use of materials with their end of life, environmental impact and reuse readiness in mind is becoming increasingly important. At the same time, product performance and the associated customer experience are expected to remain uncompromised. Balancing the continued growing demand for materials across all key consumer categories without addressing viable end of life or re-use strategies is at heart of the evolving discussion regarding circular economy. This contribution will highlight one example of sustainable material development in the Automotive composite space which brings together multiple aspects addressing this global challenge. Composites have been developed which allow for material light-weighing compared to the incumbent compounds without compromising expected and specified performance requirements which aligns directly with the overall strategy of improved energy utilization. These materials have been developed using recycled polyolfin feedstocks which are sourced within an end to end strategy and also include innovative biomaterial technology to achieve the required balance of mechanical properties and weight reduction. This composite development is an example of sustainable material development from fungible, accessible material supply chains which are envisioned to support the required scale and scope to support strategic markets such as automotive applications.
 
Break
10:15 am - 10:45 am

10:45 am

Reinforcement and replacement of plastics with hemp fibres
Bernd Frank
Managing Director
Bafa Neu
Hemp fibers are known already in compression moulding applications but not in injection moulding applications. HempFlax holds proprietary technology to pelletize the fiber with the polymer in such a way that fibre length is maintained till in the end product and improving the mechanical properties of the composite.
 

11:10 am

Reversible crosslinked polymers
Steven Eschig
Project Leader
Fraunhofer WKI
Plastics can generally be divided into two classes: thermoplastics and thermosets. Thermosets are three-dimensional, irreversible networks. Once hardened, they cannot be re-shaped but they distinguish themselves as a result of their impressive chemical resistance, high mechanical strength and low creeping. Thermoplastics consist of long-chain, mostly linear macromolecules. They can be re-melted, repeatedly re-shaped and welded, but they tend to creep and exhibit lower mechanical strength than thermoset materials. However, via the integration of a reversible crosslinking mechanism, the advantages of both polymer classes can be combined. Consequently, materials with comparable mechanical properties such as common thermosets can be produced, which can be re-shaped if needed. As a result of the irreversible crosslinking, common thermosets are mainly used for energetic purposes at their end of life. Newer approaches investigate their use as fillers. The integration of a reversible crosslinking mechanism enables the re-melting and re-shaping of the corresponding materials. Subsequently, the crosslinking can rebuild again. The efficiency of recycling, as well as the lifetime, can significantly be increased via this approach. As delegates will learn, potential fields of application are (de)bonding on demand adhesives, matrices for fiber composites, and organic sheets.
 

11:35 am

High-performance bio-based fibers for lightweight construction
Daniel Söderberg
Director
KTH Royal Institute of Technology
Given the excellent mechanical properties of nanocellulose, the building block providing structural integrity for plants and trees, is it possible to provide material concepts that complement or replace (at least partially) today’s lightweight construction materials. Recent progress within the field of bio-based materials show results that could make this a reality. As delegates will learn during this presentation, given proper processing conditions, it has been shown that filaments with high performance can be made from nanocellulose, which could provide a bio-based alternative to materials such as carbon fibers.
 

12:00 pm

Natural fibres reinforced bio-polyamides for automotive structures
Ahmed-Amine Ouali
Research assistant
Chemnitz University of Technology
In order to face environmental problems, one of the solutions consists of the development of lightweight structures in the transport industry. A fully bio-based composite can be manufactured in series production, with endless natural fibres as reinforcement and bio-based polyamides as a matrix. Compared to well-established materials, this biocomposite performs high specific mechanical and thermal properties. Furthermore, the use of this biocomposite results in a lower input production energy, CO2-footprint and costs. Continuous processes permit to produce prepregs, multilayered and shaped composites, which diversify the potential applications of this biocomposite in many automotive parts.
 
Lunch
12:25 pm - 1:15 pm
Closing the loop on a circular economy in the transportation sector
1:15 pm - 4:30 pm

Moderator:
Daniel Söderberg
Director
KTH Royal Institute of Technology

1:15 am

Circular Economy for Automotive Plastics
Richard Mckinlay
Head of Circular Economy
Axion Group
As one of the largest recyclers of Automotive Shredder Residue, Axion Polymers is driving the circular economy for automotive plastics. Using innovative business models and technology we recover thousands of tonnes of PP from end-of-life vehicles to be used in the injection moulding of various products, including automotive parts. The presentation will explain how the industry operates and how the sector can help drive higher recycling rates to provide more secondary raw materials for the industry.

1:40 pm

Acoustic elements from natural fibers by means of foam forming production technology
Ali Harlin
Research Professor
VTT
Currently, the raw materials used in acoustic products are typically made of non-renewable raw materials and are difficult to recycle. VTT has developed and demonstrated acoustic elements based on wood fiber: renewable raw-materials, recyclable products and scalable production of acoustic products for vehicles, office furniture and acoustic panels. The new materials are developed by combining VTT’s knowledge of natural fibers, acoustic engineering and foam forming production technology. Our approach enables the flexible production of environmentally friendly products with excellent sound absorption properties.

2:05 pm

New business models enabling circular economy
Peter Bartel
Marketing & Engineering Director
Circular Economy Solutions GmbH
Linear business models can only be transferred to circular economy to a limited extent. If circular economy is supposed to work, it always means implementing new business models. This will be illustrated during this presentation with examples from the automotive aftermarket.
Break
2:30 pm - 3:00 pm

3:00 pm

Recyclability – A way to leave the plastic trap?
Klaus Hauschulte
CEO
Scholz Recycling GmbH
Cars will consist of up to 30% of plastics and composites by 2030. A backbone of innovation and lightweight construction, but for sustainability, too? Could industrial cooperation and the incorporation of recyclability solve urgent issues and save costs? Ideas and principles for getting to better sustainability.

3:25 am

Panel Discussion: Can the transportation sector close the loop?
Peter Bartel
Marketing & Engineering Director
Circular Economy Solutions GmbH
Julien Van Damme
Manager Environment and Safety Planning Office
Honda Motor Europe
Klaus Hauschulte
CEO
Scholz Recycling GmbH
Karsten Brast
Founder & CEO
nature2need Europe
A discussion of current circular economy solutions for the transportation sector and debate of how new bio-based materials may impact this.

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